Poland

Lithuania, Poland, and an expiring Schengen visa
October 1, 2013


A rainy Polish countryside

The wet and rainy Polish countryside

Sorry for the temporary hiatus! I have literally spent the last two weeks in the countryside away from an internet connection. The countryside has not changed much, acres and acres of corn, potatoes, apples and recently in the south tobacco. I have been lucky to find plenty of wild camping and I often greet the local mushroom hunters in the morning. Fall begins! The temperatures at night have already dropped below 0C, and I have spent almost everyday in the rain.

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My Schengen visa, which grants 90 days of travel in all of the Schengen zone, is quickly expiring. As of today I have four weeks left in the Schengen zone. I am planning a winter Italian cycling trip so the quicker I get to the Serbian border the better. I have changed my route yet again and am heading directly south to avoid the frost. Today I will depart Krakow, Poland and will continue through Slovakia, Hungary, Serbia, Bosnia and Montenegro (where I will have reached the Mediterranean sea)!.

Its almost Halloween

Its almost Halloween

A crash course in Polish would have been nice before cycling through the villages and farm country! It was very rare that I encountered an English speaker and the Poles have a tendency to keep to themselves, meaning things got a bit lonely. There was one particular night when I camped in a stinging nettle forest, in the middle of a big storm. I was at least 10 km from any other human and I spent the whole night dreaming of isolation. So I might need to work on my social skills again when I return, nothing I can’t handle!

My first Polish sunset, a very cold camping spot in the corn fields

My first Polish sunset, a very cold camping spot in the corn fields

Warsaw, the capital was a busy, beautiful, new city. Almost all of the buildings (except for the famous Vodka distillery) were completely leveled by the Germans in the second world war. The “Old City” was actually one of the newest cities in the country built in the old style. Over 200,000 Poles lost their life in this city during the Warsaw uprising of 1942, and tens of thousands of Jews were imprisoned in the “Ghettos” before being transported to the concentration and death camps in the south. There are memorials all over the city, and walking through downtown it is hard to imagine that all this happened no more than 70 years ago!

One of the few building to survive the war

One of the few building to survive the war

The corridor of the opera building, Warsaw

The corridor of the opera building, Warsaw

 

Touring the city mostly on foot, I found a local “milk bar” and enjoyed some good Polish food, toured Jewish district and spent the evening picking grapes in the community gardens.

Two types of Perogis (dumplings) Polish and Russia, followed by a deep fried pancake filled with sauerkraut

Two types of Perogis (dumplings) Polish and Russia, followed by a deep fried pancake filled with sauerkraut

I followed the Wisla river south of Warsaw and all the way to Krakow. More Polish countryside, almost all identical to the north except for the occasional tobacco fields. People are beginning to burn wood, and in the early evenings most of the villages are covered in a smoky haze. On the second evening, in the middle of cooking some beautiful Russian pork Perogis my MSR whisperlite fuel pump failed. Cold half frozen dumplings for dinner with a raw bell pepper, I guess it could have been worse. Most of my suffering came from the fact that in another 7-10 minutes everything would have been cooked. I will not have a replacement fuel pump till Serbia, bread and cheese for dinner anyone?

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The country roads were really quiet heading into Krakow, and I spent another beautiful evening camping in some corn fields. The city has a very laid back feel compared to Warsaw. The whole downtown can be explored on foot and pedestrian bridges and river paths make it convenient to miss rush hour. The city is built around the ancient castle and the old walls still surround the city. The city has a thriving nightlife and great late night street food, zapiekanka, a half loaf of French bread turned into a pizza.

Krakow Castle

Krakow Castle

Cathedral inside

Cathedral inside

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Fried Cheese, a mandatory digestive aide

Fried Cheese, a mandatory digestive aide

Locks of love, pedestrian bridge Krakow

Locks of love, pedestrian bridge Krakow

 

Yesterday I packed into a minibus, and took the 60 km trip to Auschwitz and Birkenau. There is really not too much to say except that anyone who desires to really understand what happened should make the trip to the small city of Oswiecim. Over 1,000,000 Jews were killed at the site of Auschwitz and the near by death camp Birkenau. The tour is pretty graphic and there is one room that has over 17,000 pounds of human hair! Just a fraction of what was recovered from the camp after the red army invaded Poland.

Aucshwitz

Auschwitz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I am heading out again today, and should be in Slovakia by tomorrow morning. I will finally cross some mountains. The roads have been flat since central Sweden and I am looking forward to the landscape change. I will write again as soon as I can but it may not be until Budapest. I miss you all!

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-J

 

Intestinal parasites and a Polish village
October 6, 2013
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After leaving Krakow, and riding about 20-30 kilometers I was struck with a high fever and a terrible stomach pain. In Dobczyce, a small village just outside of Krakow, I picked up some water, aspirin and headed to the nearest forest for sleep. I found a nice, quiet stream bed and set up for the night. Temperatures dropped below zero, and I spent most of the night excreting in a small hole. Toilet paper quickly ran out and I resorted to washing with ice-cold stream water. On several occasions I would just start warming up in my sleeping bag and my stomach would groan. Back outside, into the cold dark to expel a watery stool, in a shallow hole.

View from stream bed near the lake where I was cooped up for two long nights

View from stream bed near the lake where I was cooped up for two long nights

The next day I was too weak to pack up, or even do anything but lie in tent. Without food I figured that my stomach would easy up, but it seemed that all waste was now channeled through my intestines. After another long night in the cold, and the onset of abdominal pains I decided to leave the stream bed and find a place to sleep indoors. I found lodging above a restaurant in the center of town, and quickly felt spoiled with a flushing toilet and shower.

Dobcyzce castle just in walking distance from my room

Dobcyzce castle just in walking distance from my room

After much rest, close to three days now, I continue to have constant diarrhea sometimes with blood and mucus(sorry to be so graphic). The abdominal pain has also not gone away, but seems to be getting a bit better. With tomorrow being Monday I am heading to the nearest Dr. in hope of getting some more lovely antibiotics. I have not been completely bed ridden but more likely bathroom bound, almost every hour I get the stomach pain and there better be a bathroom close, or some sort of foliage.

Church, view from my room

Church, view from my room, (very similar to Black Sabbaths debut album)

I have done a bit of exploring in the village. The window in my room faces the church and I can hear the choir sing in the evenings, beautiful Latin psalms, and sometimes devotional polish hymns. Last night, the who village gathered for a wedding in the church, and the reception was in the restaurant below me. All night a band polish fiddle band played and friends and family danced. Other than that I have been sleeping and reading. This is the most I have been off my feet in a while and I hope to get some good information tomorrow. I will keep you posted

 

Polish hops

Polish hops

 

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